Laurelmountainboro's Weblog

March 19, 2008

THE TENNIS COURTS Part 1-D

Filed under: HISTORY — laurelmountainboro @ 3:21 am

 

The clay tennis courts, another Park attraction, were built “probably in 1931 or ’32,” Harwig reports. “They were among the finest in the area,” Rose said. “The lines were painted daily and the courts were rolled every morning to compact them. Players had to wear particular shoes.” They were used continuously, from eight a. m. until dark, signed up by the hour on a weekly schedule. Rose had the nine a. m. time slot years.
                  
Rose noted tennis tournaments in the Park drew players from all over Pittsburgh, “people like Joe Kristofe, who was number one at Pitt and _________ Marker, number one at the University of West Virginia.”
                  
Park residents declared Harwig the best player there, and claimed (the late) Homer Hoffman was good too. “You had better know what you were doing if you played here,” Allshouse said. “There was excellent tennis all the time.”
                  
Harwig, who “lived on the tennis courts,” won his Wilkinsburg High School WPIAL title in 1939. “I became the number one player at Carnegie Institute of technology,” he admitted.
 

Click on THE RING  to read a short romance story, and on  THE UNICORN: MYTH OR REALITY?  to read about the unicorn. 

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1 Comment »

  1. This Ain’t the way I remember it!

    Them there Tennis courts though they was clay was mostly rocks and we spent most of out time throwing rocks off the courts into the woods. The rest of the time we were chasing the tennis balls because they would bounce every which way off of the rocks. It made it challenging alright but not because of the quality of the tennis players.

    I think we should get all the old farts that are still alive together and build new Tennis courts over the old pool since it doesnt work any more.

    Love, Jimmy

    Comment by Jimmy Joe Johnson — May 11, 2008 @ 3:44 pm | Reply


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